Month: January 2019

The Truth You Need To Know About Probiotic Foods

Frozen yogurt, cultured beverages, and other probiotic foods have become quite huge in the last few years. The main reason for this is the widely publicized benefits of probiotics for digestive health. According to many studies conducted in the past decade or so, the regular consumption of foods that contain these bad bacteria is necessary to keep the digestive system efficiently running.

The results of these studies have been published in magazines, newspapers and on the Internet, prompting millions of people all over the world high cultured malaysia to make changes to their regular diets to accommodate these new healthy foods and enjoy better digestive health.

But in the course of advertising their probiotic foods, many manufacturers have conveniently left out some crucial details of the studies that will make people see these products in a completely different light.

Before we reveal what these details are, we first need to make it clear that probiotics are beneficial to digestive health – there is no question about that. They are actual live microorganisms that can reside in the human intestine, enhancing digestion, improving immunity to diseases, and fighting harmful bacteria that may also flourish inside the body.

Consuming more of these micro-organisms by way of probiotic foods does seem like a good idea, but upon close examination, it can turn out to be severely flawed.

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First of all, there is no way to regulate the number of bacteria that you are getting from these foods. Although the labels to indicate the recommended serving size, there is nothing that can stop someone from eating a lot more if they happened to like the taste, and this can lead to an overgrowth of bacteria in the intestine.

It is also interesting to know that a lot of the health benefits that were attributed to probiotics some time ago have already been dismissed by the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA) because they didn’t have enough proof or substantiation.

On the contrary, a new kind of supplement has been brought to light, which is now being considered as the ultimate key to healthy digestion. These are the prebiotic supplements, which mostly give all the health benefits initially associated with probiotics.

It is found naturally in food items such as whole grains, nuts, fruits and vegetables, prebiotics work by encouraging the proliferation of good bacteria that are already in the intestines while bringing down the wrong bacteria count at the same time.

Also, prebiotic supplements can also increase the body’s absorption of nutrients, strengthen the immune system, regularize bowel movements, and promote efficient breaking down of food. The ones that are made from kiwi fruits, in particular, can also raise one’s energy level, reduce the recovery period after being ill, protect against allergies, and boost cardiovascular health. All this is so much more than what probiotic foods can do.

Again, let us clarify that probiotics are not bad. In fact, for cases wherein the good … Read More

Les usages Liposuccion

La liposuccion est principalement utilisée pour améliorer l’apparence plutôt que pour améliorer la santé physique. La plupart des gens obtiendraient probablement les mêmes résultats, voire davantage, en adoptant un mode de vie sain, une alimentation équilibrée, une activité physique régulière et un horaire de sommeil sain.

La liposuccion est normalement conseillée uniquement si les changements de mode de vie n’ont pas donné les résultats souhaités. Il peut traiter les zones grasses résistantes à l’exercice et à l’alimentation.

Lorsqu’un individu prend du poids, chaque cellule adipeuse augmente en taille et en volume. La liposuccion réduit le nombre de cellules graisseuses dans les zones isolées.

Les gens devraient discuter des avantages et des inconvénients de la liposuccion geneve avec leur médecin avant de décider de procéder ou non. La liposuccion ne doit être effectuée qu’après un examen attentif.

Les résultats sont subtils plutôt que dramatiques.

Les zones du corps suivantes sont généralement ciblées pour le traitement de liposuccion:

La liposuccion est esthétique plutôt que axée sur la santé.

• abdomen

• retour

• fesses

• poitrine

• genoux intérieurs

• les hanches

• les flancs (poignées d’amour)

• décolleté et la zone sous le menton

• cuisses, sacoches ou cuisses extérieures et cuisses intérieures

• le haut des bras

La liposuccion convient particulièrement aux personnes ayant un tonus de la peau et une bonne élasticité, où la peau se moule à de nouveaux contours.

Les personnes dont la peau manque d’élasticité peuvent se retrouver avec une peau lâche dans les zones où la procédure a été effectuée.

La personne doit avoir plus de 18 ans et être en bonne santé. Ceux qui ont des problèmes de circulation ou de circulation sanguine, tels que la maladie coronarienne, le diabète ou un système immunitaire affaibli ne doivent pas subir de liposuccion.

Avantages

La liposuccion est normalement effectuée à des fins esthétiques, mais elle est parfois utilisée pour traiter certaines affections.

Ceux-ci inclus:

• Lymphoedème: affection chronique ou à long terme dans laquelle un excès de liquide appelé lymphe s’accumule dans les tissus, provoquant un œdème ou un gonflement. L’œdème se produit généralement dans les bras ou les jambes. La liposuccion est parfois utilisée pour réduire l’enflure, la gêne et la douleur.

• Gynécomastie: Parfois, la graisse s’accumule sous les seins d’un homme.

• Syndrome de lipodystrophie: la graisse s’accumule dans une partie du corps et se perd dans une autre. La liposuccion peut améliorer l’apparence du patient en offrant une répartition de la graisse corporelle plus naturelle.

• Perte de poids extrême après l’obésité: une personne souffrant d’obésité morbide qui perd au moins 40% de son IMC peut avoir besoin d’un traitement pour éliminer l’excès de peau et d’autres anomalies.

• Lipomes: Ce sont des tumeurs bénignes et grasses.… Read More

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at… Read More

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at… Read More

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at… Read More